Flow Monitoring Dashboard / Dataset

Country
Title Standard
South Sudan — Flow Monitoring Dataset / Dashboard ({DATE})
Operation
Contact
DTM South Sudan, SouthSudanDTM@iom.int
Component
Confidential
Contact
DTM South Sudan, SouthSudanDTM@iom.int
Language
English
Location
South Sudan
Period Covered
Jan 02 2021
Sep 30 2021
Activity
  • Other
  • Flow Monitoring

Summary

Since mid-June 2020, people in South Sudan have been affected by flooding in areas along the White Nile. As numbers increased, a temporary site for flood displaced population was set up in Mangala river port and Bor/Juba bus station, where the first group of IDPs arrived on 3 August 2020, and data have been collected since. According to the World Food Programme (WFP), 17,952 individuals/4,911 households were registered in Mangala as of 31 May 2021 (CES-ICCG). DTM continued with implementation of the Rapid Flow Monitoring tool which supplies partners with the number of new arrivals and a basic profile of populations arriving and leaving the site, including areas of departure and intended destinations. Between 2 January and 30 September 2021, DTM surveyed 831 groups representing 4,414 individuals, 4,337 of which were new arrivals. The monthly average of new arrival is 380 individuals. September present an increased of arrivals at the port compared to the previous months (1,294).

Contact
DTM South Sudan, SouthSudanDTM@iom.int
Language
English
Location
South Sudan
Period Covered
May 01 2021
May 31 2021
Activity
  • Flow Monitoring

Summary

DTM’s Flow Monitoring Registry (FMR) surveys people on the move at key transit points within South Sudan (SSD) and at its borders. It provides an insight into mobility trends, migration drivers and traveller profiles to inform programming by humanitarian and development partners and by the government, complementing DTM’s monitoring of COVID-19 mobility restrictions. In total, 23 Flow Monitoring Points (FMPs) were active in May 2021, surveying internal flows and cross-border travel with Uganda (UGA), the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Sudan (SDN), Ethiopia (ETH), Kenya (KEN) and the Central African Republic (CAR). A new FMP was activated at Nadapal (Kapoeta East) along the Kenya border, while data collection at Renk North Checkpoint was again suspended as a result of access issues. Figures are only indicative of existing trends among respondents at the active FMPs since DTM does not have full coverage of cross-border or internal flows. Participation in the survey is voluntary and anonymous.

Please click here to access a summary dataset. 

 
Contact
DTM South Sudan, SouthSudanDTM@iom.int
Language
English
Location
South Sudan
Period Covered
Apr 01 2021
Apr 30 2021
Activity
  • Flow Monitoring

Summary

DTM’s Flow Monitoring Registry (FMR) surveys people on the move at key transit points within South Sudan (SSD) and at its borders. It provides an insight into mobility trends, migration drivers and traveller profiles to inform programming by humanitarian and development partners and by the government, complementing DTM’s monitoring of COVID-19 mobility restrictions. In total, 25 Flow Monitoring Points (FMPs) were active in April 2021, surveying internal flows and cross-border travel with Uganda (UGA), the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Sudan (SDN), Ethiopia (ETH) and the Central African Republic (CAR). At the beginning of April, Ariath FMP in Aweil North was relocated to Jaach, while Bentiu (Bimruok) was relocated to Bentiu (Suksita) to better capture relevant migration flows, with 23 of the 25 FMPs active at any one time. Figures are only indicative of existing trends among respondents at the active FMPs since DTM does not have full coverage of cross-border or internal flows. Participation in the survey is voluntary and anonymous.

Please click here to access a summary dataset. 

Contact
DTM South Sudan, SouthSudanDTM@iom.int
Language
English
Location
South Sudan
Period Covered
Mar 01 2021
Mar 31 2021
Activity
  • Flow Monitoring

Summary

DTM’s Flow Monitoring Registry (FMR) surveys people on the move at key transit points within South Sudan (SSD) and at its borders. It provides an insight into mobility trends, migration drivers and traveller profiles to inform programming by humanitarian and development partners and by the government, complementing DTM’s monitoring of COVID-19 mobility restrictions. In total, 23 Flow Monitoring Points (FMPs) were active in March 2021, surveying internal flows and crossborder travel with Uganda (UGA), the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Sudan (SDN), Ethiopia (ETH) and the Central African Republic (CAR). Operations at Renk North Checkpoint resumed in March after being suspended due to access issues. Figures are only indicative of existing trends among respondents at the active FMPs since DTM does not have full coverage of cross-border or internal flows. Participation in the survey is voluntary and anonymous.

Please click here to access a summary dataset. 

Contact
DTM South Sudan, SouthSudanDTM@iom.int
Language
English
Location
South Sudan
Period Covered
Jan 01 2021
Mar 31 2021
Activity
  • Flow Monitoring

Summary

IOM’s Displacement Tracking Matrix (DTM) continued operating Displacement Site Flow Monitoring (DSFM) at the gates of Malakal Protection of Civilians (PoC) site. During this period, 3,073 interviews were conducted representing 4,544 individual movements in to and out of the site. There was a 6.0 per cent decrease in surveyed day movements relative to October – December 2020, most of which are for farming / fishing (23.0%) and other livelihood activities. Individuals embark on longer temporary travel primarily to visit friends or family (47.0%) and for farming / fishing (12.0%), with 36.0 per cent of temporary travels lasting more than six months. Women and girls are slightly over-represented among both same day and temporary travelers. The number of surveyed new arrivals, 48.0 per cent of whom intend to stay more than six months, increased by a third relative to the previous quarter (309 compared to 229). Common reasons for new arrivals were to join family (34.0%) or because their homes had been destroyed by natural disasters (14.0%). Surveyed permanent exits increased from 30 to 67 individuals, 82.0 per cent of whom traveled to join family in areas of return or relocation

Contact
DTM South Sudan, SouthSudanDTM@iom.int
Language
English
Location
South Sudan
Period Covered
Jan 01 2021
Mar 31 2021
Activity
  • Flow Monitoring

Summary

IOM’s Displacement Tracking Matrix (DTM) continued operating Displacement Site Flow Monitoring (DSFM) at the main entry and exit points of Naivasha IDP camp. During this period, 2,160 interviews were conducted representing 9,279 individual movements in to and out of the camp. There has been a 13.0 per cent increase in surveyed day movements in this quarter. These usually take place for livelihood activities (43.0%), education (8.0%), and food distribution on-site (6.0%), while the few longer temporary movements were primarily to visit friends or family and to access healthcare services. The number of surveyed new arrivals, most of whom intend to stay for more than six months, decreased to 11 individuals compared to 21 in the previous quarter. Most of these movements were for family reasons (91.0%). Surveyed permanent exits also decreased from 71 to 57 individuals, almost all of whom traveled because of improved circumstances in areas of return.

Contact
DTM South Sudan, SouthSudanDTM@iom.int
Language
English
Location
South Sudan
Period Covered
Jan 01 2021
Mar 31 2021
Activity
  • Flow Monitoring

Summary

IOM’s Displacement Tracking Matrix (DTM) continued operating Displacement Site Flow Monitoring (DSFM) at Wau Masna Collective Centre. In the first quarter of 2021 (January – March), 2,312 interviews were conducted, representing 5,450 individual movements. This quarter recorded a 24.0 per cent increase in surveyed day movements, as people travel in and out of the camp to pursue livelihood activities including collection of firewood and elephant grass (41.0%), to buy things (14.0%), to visit friends or relatives (13.0%), and to access healthcare services (9.0%). Longer temporary movements were primarily to visit friends or family (61.0%), check on or repair property (21.0%), and access healthcare services (8.0%), with 51.0 per cent lasting two to four weeks. There were 53 new arrivals compared to 24 during the previous quarter, all of whom came to join family and almost half of whom planned to remain a week or less. Surveyed permanent exits decreased from 24 to 4 individuals, who join family outside the camp.

Contact
DTM South Sudan, SouthSudanDTM@iom.int
Language
English
Location
South Sudan
Period Covered
Jan 01 2021
Mar 31 2021
Activity
  • Flow Monitoring

Summary

IOM’s Displacement Tracking Matrix (DTM) continued operating Displacement Site Flow Monitoring (DSFM) at the gates of Bentiu IDP camp. In the first quarter of 2021 (January – March), 5,505 interviews were conducted representing 19,230 individual movements in and out of the site. There has been a 12.0 per cent decrease in surveyed day movements compared to the previous quarter. Most day movements were by women and girls (80.0%), usually travelling for livelihood reasons. The most common reason for longer temporary movement was to visit friends or family (22.0%), followed by attempting to return home (17.7%). Flow monitoring enumerators also surveyed 169 newly arriving individuals, compared to 64 in October – December 2020, 44.5 per cent of whom intend to stay more than six months. About two in five individuals came to join family (42.0%), followed by access to healthcare (16.6%) and family visits (14.0%). The number of surveyed permanent exits increased to 206, from 176 in October – December 2020, 70.0 per cent of whom were women and girls. The most common reason for exit was improved circumstances at destination (32.0%), followed by looking for education opportunities (19.0%)

Contact
DTM South Sudan, SouthSudanDTM@iom.int
Language
English
Location
South Sudan
Period Covered
Feb 01 2021
Feb 28 2021
Activity
  • Flow Monitoring

Summary

DTM’s Flow Monitoring Registry (FMR) surveys people on the move at key transit points within South Sudan (SSD) and at its borders. It provides an insight into mobility trends, migration drivers and traveller profiles to inform programming by humanitarian and development partners and by the government, complementing DTM’s monitoring of COVID-19 mobility restrictions. In total, 22 Flow Monitoring Points (FMPs) were active in February 2021, surveying internal flows and cross-border travel with Uganda (UGA), the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Sudan (SDN), Ethiopia (ETH) and the Central African Republic (CAR). Nine FMPs were deactivated at the end of January in Raja (Raja Town, Delieba), Aweil North (Gokmachar), Juba (Juba Customs Bus Station, Nesitu Checkpoint), Kajo-Keji (Jale / Litoba, Kerwa), Ezo (Nabia Pai) and Aweil East (Warawara) Counties. Operations at Renk North Checkpoint remained suspended due to access issues. Outgoing flows to Ethiopia largely took place via alternative routes, avoiding the flow monitoring points in Pagak and Burebyei. Figures are only indicative of existing trends among respondents at the active FMPs since DTM does not have full coverage of cross-border or internal flows. Participation in the survey is voluntary and anonymous.

Please click here to access the dataset. 

Contact
DTM South Sudan, SouthSudanDTM@iom.int
Language
English
Location
South Sudan
Period Covered
Oct 01 2020
Dec 31 2020
Activity
  • Flow Monitoring

Summary

IOM’s Displacement Tracking Matrix continued operating Displacement Site Flow Monitoring (DSFM) at the gates of Bentiu Protection of Civilians (PoC) site. In the last quarter of 2020 (October – December), 5,077 interviews were conducted representing 17,347 individual movements in and out of the site. There has been a 17 per cent increase in surveyed day movements compared to the previous quarter, in line with a similar increase in daily gate count volume. Most day movements out of the site were by women and girls (77%), usually travelling for livelihood reasons. On the other hand, the main reason for temporary movement was to visit friends or family, followed by attempting to return home. Flow monitoring enumerators also surveyed 64 newly arriving individuals, compared to 44 in DSFM July – September 2020. Almost half came to join family, followed by access to healthcare and other services. Over two thirds of new arivals intend to stay more than six months. The number of surveyed permanent exits from the site reduced slightly to 176 (200 in July - September), 61 per cent of whom were women and girls. The main reason for exit was improved circumstances at destination (48%), followed by safety concerns (15%).