Europe

Migration Flows

West & Central Africa

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Stranded migrants and refugees
62,428
As of 03 October 2018
Migrant presence in Europe

Country

Number of migrants and asylum seekers

Update Date

Albania

173

29 Aug 2018

Bosnia and Herzegovina

3,923

28 Nov 2018

Bulgaria

653

09 Jan 2019

Croatia

316

16 Jan 2019

Cyprus

250

28 Nov 2018

Greece

60,083

26 Dec 2018

Hungary

137

05 Sep 2018

Italy

135,858

26 Dec 2018

Kosovo (SCR 1244)

88

26 Dec 2018

Montenegro

155

09 Jan 2019

Romania

345

16 Jan 2019

Serbia

4,482

16 Jan 2019

Slovenia

314

09 Jan 2019

the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia

42

16 Jan 2019

For Croatia, Cyprus, and Slovenia, figures represent number of asylum seekers.
For Greece beginning in 2018, figures based on monthly available data for different types of accommodation facilities excluding the number of self-settled migrants and refugees.
For Italy, figures refer to migrants in reception at the end of the month. Data on migrants in centres for repatriation/expulsion are not included in these figures. 
For Hungary, figures are as of 5 September 2018 and more updated migrant presence information is not available for the time being.
Data Sources: National Authorities, IOM and UNHCR

While populations from the Middle East, South East Asia, and Africa have been crossing the Mediterranean to reach Europe in growing numbers since 2011, 2015 marked the sharpest increase of arrivals to Europe and deaths in the Mediterranean.

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About

Migration.iom.int is an IOM online platform designed to enhance access to Displacement Tracking Matrix (DTM) migration flow information products, including a visualization of population flows. The DTM also has a second online platform, displacement.iom.int, designed to visualize internal displacement monitored through the DTM systems; this platform facilitates a better understanding of mobility trends within a country in assessed areas.

 

The DTM is a system designed to track and monitor displacement and population mobility, provide critical information to decision-makers and responders during crises, and contribute to better understandings of population flows. The DTM includes four standard components – each comprising various tools and methods – that can be applied, adapted and combined as relevant in a particular context. The standard components are: (i) mobility tracking; (ii) flow monitoring; (iii) registration and (iv) surveys. Data visualized on the flow.iom.int website is retrieved from flow monitoring exercises. 

A Flow Monitoring exercise collects information on the volume and basic characteristics of populations transiting through selected locations - referred to as Flow Monitoring Points (FMPs) – during specific observation hours. Data collected includes previous transit point(s), next destination, intended destination (when possible) and means of transportation, as well as the number, sex and nationality of migrants passing through the Flow Monitoring Point. Data is collected overtime through periodic cycles.

Once baseline data is collected through Flow Monitoring exercises. When required and as needed, Flow Monitoring Surveys (FMS) are then implemented to collect multi-layer and multi-themed data on mobile populations. FMS collect data at the individual level and include, but are not limited to, information on basic socio-economic profiles, information regarding the journey (cost, routes, modes of transport, intermediaries) and some basic data on the intentions, expectations, and perceptions of the final destination that migrants have. The findings of these surveys are used in the overall analysis presented in the IOM Flow Monitoring reports.

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Flow monitoring data collection and operations are funded by:

DTM Support Team

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