Europe

Migration Flows

West & Central Africa

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Arrivals to Europe 2019
106,902
88,049
By sea
18,853
By land
As of 10 October 2018
Arrivals to Europe
144,166
2018
186,768
2017
390,432
2016
Mediterranean Dead/Missing
555
2019
Mediterranean Dead/Missing
2,299
2018
3,139
2017
Recent trends
Countries of first arrival to Europe

Country

Arrivals

Percentage
Change

Previous week
30 May - 05 Jun

Current week
06 Jun - 12 Jun

Cyprus

136

8

-94%

Greece

1,047

609

-41%

Italy

316

251

-20%

Spain

454

303

-33%

Total first arrival countries*

1,953

1,171

-40%

Registered Migrants in Other countries*

Bosnia and Herzegovina

598

1,668

178%

Montenegro

85

94

10%

Romania

9

6

-33%

Serbia

585

118

-79%

North Macedonia

15

12

-20%

*Includes data for Cyprus which is not available on a weekly basis.

 

Main nationalities of arrivals (in descendant order)*:

To Italy**: Bangladesh, Tunisia, Algeria, Iraq, Senegal (February 2019)

To Greece: Afghanistan, Palestinian Territories, Syrian Arab Republic, Iraq, Congo (February 2019)

To Spain: Sub-Saharan Africa, Morocco, Algeria, Guinea Conakry, Côte d'Ivoire (February 2019)

To Bulgaria: Afghanistan, the Islamic Republic of Iran, Syrian Arab Republic, Pakistan, Iraq (February 2019)

*Data on nationalities is compiled on a monthly basis.

**The information on nationality breakdown provided is based on the nationality declared by migrants as reported by the Italian Ministry of Interior.

 

1,188,018 IDPs in 149,357 households were identified in six states in north-eastern Nigeria in January to February 2015. 56% of the IDP population in the sites are children, 8.7% are below 1 year old and 54% are female. 7.5% of the IDP population is above 60 years old.

1,188,018 IDPs in 149,357 households were identified in 43 displacement sites in Adamawa, Borno and Taraba states. 27,612 IDPs are displaced in 18 sites in Adamawa state. 120,872 IDPs are displaced in 15 sites in Borno state. 5,524 IDPs are displaced in 10 sites in Taraba state.

As of 14 December 2014, 389,281 IDPs in 60,232 households were identified in the first round of assessments.

10,040 migrants were recorded across 9 flow monitoring points. 1,187 were recorded in detention centers, 6,593 at transit points, 1,726 at public gathering points, 85 in private settings and 449 in other public buildings. 

11,250 crossing migrants were identified through 489 FMP baseline assessments from July to December 2016. During the same time, DTM analyzed 8,135 migrant surveys. The main nationalities are Niger (24%), Egypt (21%), Sudan (13%), Nigeria (9%), and Chad (6%).

During the reporting period covering the 1st to the 15th of April 2016 IOM recorded four shipwrecks of the coast of Libya. In total, DTM recorded 511 migrants from 11 April - 12 April 2012. More than 17,500 stranded migrants and 8,500 IDP families have received NFIs and hygiene kits since 2014.

Between December 2016 and January 2017, the number of identified IDPs increased by 129,386 individuals (7.3% increase). This brings the total number if IDPs in Nigeria to 1,899,830 (337,353 households).

As of the 31 December, the conflict in the northeastern part of Nigeria has left an estimated 1,770,444 people displaced across 6 most affected states.

The dashboard is a map indicating the number of returnees per LGA. 1,099,509 returnees returned to Adamawa, Borno and Yobe States. 64,151 (5.8%) are Nigerian refugees from Chad and Cameroon. The map indicates return areas, inaccessible areas, water boundaries and state boundaries. 

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About

Migration.iom.int is an IOM online platform designed to enhance access to Displacement Tracking Matrix (DTM) migration flow information products, including a visualization of population flows. The DTM also has a second online platform, displacement.iom.int, designed to visualize internal displacement monitored through the DTM systems; this platform facilitates a better understanding of mobility trends within a country in assessed areas.

 

The DTM is a system designed to track and monitor displacement and population mobility, provide critical information to decision-makers and responders during crises, and contribute to better understandings of population flows. The DTM includes four standard components – each comprising various tools and methods – that can be applied, adapted and combined as relevant in a particular context. The standard components are: (i) mobility tracking; (ii) flow monitoring; (iii) registration and (iv) surveys. Data visualized on the flow.iom.int website is retrieved from flow monitoring exercises. 

A Flow Monitoring exercise collects information on the volume and basic characteristics of populations transiting through selected locations - referred to as Flow Monitoring Points (FMPs) – during specific observation hours. Data collected includes previous transit point(s), next destination, intended destination (when possible) and means of transportation, as well as the number, sex and nationality of migrants passing through the Flow Monitoring Point. Data is collected overtime through periodic cycles.

Once baseline data is collected through Flow Monitoring exercises. When required and as needed, Flow Monitoring Surveys (FMS) are then implemented to collect multi-layer and multi-themed data on mobile populations. FMS collect data at the individual level and include, but are not limited to, information on basic socio-economic profiles, information regarding the journey (cost, routes, modes of transport, intermediaries) and some basic data on the intentions, expectations, and perceptions of the final destination that migrants have. The findings of these surveys are used in the overall analysis presented in the IOM Flow Monitoring reports.

Map disclaimer:  Base map from Google and country shapes from ESRI are for illustration purposes only. Names and boundaries do not imply official endorsement or acceptance by IOM.

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Flow monitoring data collection and operations are funded by:

DTM Support Team

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