Europe

Arrivals to Europe 2018
106,902
88,049
By sea
18,853
By land
As of 10 October 2018
Mediterranean Dead/Missing
1,989
2018
Arrivals to Europe
186,768
2017
390,432
2016
Mediterranean Dead/Missing
3,139
2017
5,143
2016
Recent trends
Countries of first arrival to Europe

Country

Arrivals

Percentage
Change

Previous week
01 Nov - 07 Nov

Current week
08 Nov - 14 Nov

Bulgaria

144

45

-68%

Greece

398

560

40%

Italy

201

286

42%

Spain

856

1,186

38%

Total first arrival countries*

1,599

2,077

30%

Serbia

196

288

46%

the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia

16

41

156%

*Includes data for Cyprus which is not available on a weekly basis.

 

Main nationalities of arrivals (in descendant order):

To Italy*: Tunisia, Eritrea, Sudan, Pakistan, Iraq (September 2018)

To Greece: Syrian Arab Republic, Iraq, Afghanistan, Cameroon, Democratic Republic of the Congo (September 2018)

To Spain: Sub-Saharan Africa, Morocco, Guinea, Mali, Côte d’Ivoire (September 2018)

To Bulgaria: Iraq, Syrian Arab Republic, Afghanistan, Pakistan (September 2018)

 

*The information on nationality breakdown provided is based on the nationality declared by migrants as reported by the Italian Ministry of Interior.

 

In October 2015, IOM launched its Early Warning Information Sharing Network to commence sharing data between IOM, government agencies, and other humanitarian actors in affected countries of arriv

These second results take into account the 2,385 migrants and refugees that were interviewed from 07 December 2015 to 14 March 2016. 7.2% of respondents answered ‘yes’ to one of the trafficking and other exploitative practices indicators, based on their own direct experience.

Between 8 October 2015 and 8 March 2016 IOM field staff in Greece, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Croatia, Slovenia and Hungary amassed interviews with 7, 616 migrants and refugees, of which 722 people were interviewed over the week from 1 – 8 March. The analysis of the responses from

In October 2015, IOM launched its Early Warning Information Sharing Network to commence sharing data between IOM, government agencies, and other humanitarian actors in affected countries of arriv

Between 8 October 2015 and 29 February 2016 IOM field staff in Greece, fYROM, Croatia, Slovenia and Hungary amassed interviews with 6, 961 migrants and refugees, of which 694 people were interviewed over the week from 16 – 29 February.

In October 2015, IOM launched its Early Warning Information Sharing Network to commence sharing data between IOM, government agencies, and other humanitarian actors in affected countries of arriv

Between 8 October 2015 and 22 February 2016 IOM field staff in Greece, fYROM, Croatia, Slovenia and Hungary amassed interviews with 5,700 migrants and asylum seekers, of which 413 people were interviewed over the week from 16 – 22 February.

In October 2015, IOM launched its Early Warning Information Sharing Network to commence sharing data between IOM, government agencies, and other humanitarian actors in affected countries of arriv

For these first results, 1,042 migrants and refugees were interviewed from 07 December 2015 to 22 February 2016. 10% of respondents answered ‘yes’ to one of the trafficking and exploitation indicators, based on their own direct experience.

In October 2015, IOM launched its Early Warning Information Sharing Network to commence sharing data between IOM, government agencies, and other humanitarian actors in affected countries of arriv

This report contains the findings of IOM’s Displacement Tracking Matrix (DTM) from surveys conducted between 08 October 2015 and 16 February 2016.

In October 2015, IOM launched its Early Warning Information Sharing Network to commence sharing data between IOM, government agencies, and other humanitarian actors in affected countries of arriv

In October 2015, IOM launched its Early Warning Information Sharing Network to commence sharing data between IOM, government agencies, and other humanitarian actors in affected countries of arriv

In October 2015, IOM launched its Early Warning Information Sharing Network to commence sharing data between IOM, government agencies, and other humanitarian actors in affected countries of arriv

In October 2015, IOM launched its Early Warning Information Sharing Network to commence sharing data between IOM, government agencies, and other humanitarian actors in affected countries of arriv

In October 2015, IOM launched its Early Warning Information Sharing Network to commence sharing data between IOM, government agencies, and other humanitarian actors in affected countries of arriv

While populations from the Middle East, South East Asia, and Africa have been crossing the Mediterranean to reach Europe in growing numbers since 2011, 2015 marked the sharpest increase of arrivals to Europe and deaths in the Mediterranean.

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About

Migration.iom.int is an IOM online platform designed to enhance access to Displacement Tracking Matrix (DTM) migration flow information products, including a visualization of population flows. The DTM also has a second online platform, displacement.iom.int, designed to visualize internal displacement monitored through the DTM systems; this platform facilitates a better understanding of mobility trends within a country in assessed areas.

 

The DTM is a system designed to track and monitor displacement and population mobility, provide critical information to decision-makers and responders during crises, and contribute to better understandings of population flows. The DTM includes four standard components – each comprising various tools and methods – that can be applied, adapted and combined as relevant in a particular context. The standard components are: (i) mobility tracking; (ii) flow monitoring; (iii) registration and (iv) surveys. Data visualized on the flow.iom.int website is retrieved from flow monitoring exercises. 

A Flow Monitoring exercise collects information on the volume and basic characteristics of populations transiting through selected locations - referred to as Flow Monitoring Points (FMPs) – during specific observation hours. Data collected includes previous transit point(s), next destination, intended destination (when possible) and means of transportation, as well as the number, sex and nationality of migrants passing through the Flow Monitoring Point. Data is collected overtime through periodic cycles.

Once baseline data is collected through Flow Monitoring exercises. When required and as needed, Flow Monitoring Surveys (FMS) are then implemented to collect multi-layer and multi-themed data on mobile populations. FMS collect data at the individual level and include, but are not limited to, information on basic socio-economic profiles, information regarding the journey (cost, routes, modes of transport, intermediaries) and some basic data on the intentions, expectations, and perceptions of the final destination that migrants have. The findings of these surveys are used in the overall analysis presented in the IOM Flow Monitoring reports.

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